Skip to main content
Parques Nacionais

Alasca, Colorado, Virgínia, Wyoming, Carolina do Sul, Califórnia, Utah, Washington, Flórida

20 paisagens incríveis que esperam por você nos parques nacionais dos EUA

Por: Hal Amen

1 of 1
  • States:
    Alasca
    Colorado
    Virgínia
    Wyoming
    Carolina do Sul
    Califórnia
    Utah
    Washington
    Flórida

Norte-americanos e estrangeiros em visita aos EUA têm acesso a 59 parques nacionais. Agrupadas, as características e oportunidades são mais diversificadas que em qualquer outro lugar do mundo.

Dos picos gelados da Brooks Range, em Gates of the Arctic, às terras úmidas subtropicais dos Everglades, na Flórida; do calor sufocante que faz no Vale da Morte californiano, que fica abaixo do nível do mar, à névoa que levanta das montanhas de Shenandoah, na Virgínia; de geleiras a mangues e a cachoeiras e a desfiladeiros e a imponentes florestas: se você visitar todos os 59 parques nacionais dos Estados Unidos, será possível entender muito bem a geologia e ecologia do nosso planeta. De vários desses parques, você sem dúvida já ouviu o nome. De outros, pode ser que ouça pela primeira vez. Mas quer eles sejam destino de 10 milhões de visitantes por ano (Great Smoky) ou mal cheguem a 1.000 frequentadores (Vale Kobuk), todos valem a viagem. Veja a seguir uma inspiração para você começar o planejamento.

Parque Nacional de Wrangell–St. Elias

Many of these park names may be familiar to you. Some you may be hearing for the first time. But whether they see 10 million annual visitors (Great Smoky) or barely a 1,000 (Kobuk Valley), all are worth a trip. Here’s some inspiration to get you planning. Wrangell–St. Elias National Park

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park

NPS Photo - Neal Herbert

Aerial Photo from Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve

The largest park in the country, Wrangell-St. Elias lies in a corner of southern Alaska, adjacent to the Yukon's Kluane National Park just over the border. Its 20,000 square miles make for a whole lot of potential exploration; pictured above is a hiker on the Skookum Volcano Trail.

Canyonlands National Park

John Fowler

Canyonlands National Park

Just south of Moab and the more recognized Arches National Park, Canyonlands also features some impressive sandstone arch formations, as well as canyons of monumental scale, carved by the Colorado and Green Rivers.

Shenandoah National Park

Josh Grenier

Shenandoah National Park

Encompassing a long strip of both the Blue Ridge Mountains and adjacent Shenandoah River Valley, this Virginia national park gets super popular during the fall, when leaf peepers arrive to complete the 105-mile Skyline Drive.

Yellowstone National Park

The world's first national park is also one of its most unique and well visited. The 3,400 square miles of Yellowstone hold geysers, mountain lakes, forests, river canyons, waterfalls, and many threatened species. Above is an aerial shot of the Grand Prismatic Spring, the third-largest hot spring in the world.

Congaree National Park

Congaree National Park

I had honestly never heard of this park prior to researching this piece, but after reading up, I totally want to go. Congaree protects a vast tract of marshy hardwood forest along the river of the same name just southeast of Columbia, South Carolina. Its old-growth cypress trees are some of the tallest in the American East.

Death Valley National Park

Death Valley National Park

Low and hot—Death Valley is home to both the lowest elevations and hottest temperatures in the US. But the landscape in this part of California is actually incredibly diverse, ranging from saltpans like the Devil's Racetrack, pictured above, to snow-capped mountains reaching 11,000ft.

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bruce Canyon National Park

Bryce sits in southern Utah and features a massive collection of natural amphitheaters covered in rock formations known as hoodoos.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky is surrounded by kitschy tourist towns and is the most visited national park, thanks to its location near the East Coast and free admission. Still, once you're there, you can see scenes like this.

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park

Named for the largest of its three signature peaks, Grand Teton National Park also contains lakes, forest, and a section of the Snake River. It sits just south of Yellowstone in western Wyoming, and together they represent one of the largest protected ecosystems in the world.

Olympic National Park

Covering nearly a million acres on the peninsula of the same name in northwestern Washington, the terrain of this park is super variable, ranging from Pacific coastline to alpine peaks to temperate rainforest.

Great Sand Dunes National Park

Great Sand Dunes National Park

One of the country's newest national parks (designated in 2004), Great Sand Dunes lies in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado. Featuring the tallest sand dunes on the continent, backed by multiple 13,000ft mountains, this is also one of the few places in the country where you can try sandboarding.

Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park

The central draw of Yosemite is the 7-square-mile valley of the same name, with its glacially carved peaks, sequoia groves, and spectacular waterfalls. To beat the crowds, get out and explore some of the other areas in this massive park in the Eastern Sierras.

Arches National Park

This aptly named park in eastern Utah, just north of Moab, is home to some 2,000 sandstone arches that come in all shapes and sizes. Above is one of the most photographed, Delicate Arch.

Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park

There are no roads leading to this park in southeastern Alaska, so your choices for getting there are: by raft via the Tatshenshini and Alsek Rivers (from Canada), by plane (usually out of Juneau), or, most commonly, by cruise ship.

Kings Canyon National Park

Kings Canyon National Park

Like Sequoia National Park next door, Kings Canyon is home to some seriously massive trees. Seen above is a stout ponderosa pine on the Bubbs Creek Trail.

Big Bend National Park

Expansive desert plains, 7,800ft mountains, and high Rio Grande canyons (Santa Elena Canyon shown above) define Big Bend National Park in western Texas. It's also distinguished as an International Dark Sky Park, marking it a great place for stargazing.

Denali National Park

Denali National Park

As far as views from the visitor center go, this one is pretty spectacular. The 6 million acres of Denali, in central Alaska, include the highest section of the Alaska Range (with the peak that gives the park its name), glaciers, river valleys, and abundant wildlife such as grizzly bears, caribou, gray wolves, golden eagles, wolverines, and Dall sheep.

Everglades National Park

Jupiterimages

Aerial view of Florida Everglades

Preserving one of the most significant wetland ecosystems anywhere in the world, southern Florida's Everglades protect rare species such as the Florida panther and American crocodile. The water in the park is actually an enormous river that runs from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay at a speed of about a quarter mile per day.

Gates of the Arctic National Park

NPS Photo

Remote river in Gates of the Arctic

As its name suggests, this is the northernmost park in the US, and is also one of the largest. Its predominant geographic feature is the Brooks Range. With zero road access, you have to hike or fly in, but once there, you've got pretty much an endless list of wilderness hiking and camping options.

Grand Canyon National Park

For the past several million years, the Colorado River has been slowly but steadily grinding its way through the rock of the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona. Reaching a width of 18 miles and a depth of 6,000 feet, the Grand Canyon is on a scale of few other places on Earth.

Foto aérea do Parque Nacional e Reserva de Wrangell-St. Elias

Foto aérea do Parque Nacional e Reserva de Wrangell-St. Elias
Ver mais
National Parks Service/Neal Herbert

Parque Nacional de Canyonlands

Ao sul de Moab e do famoso Parque Nacional dos Arcos, o Canyonlands também conta com impressionantes formações de arenito em formato de arco, além de desfiladeiros de escala monumental esculpidos pelos Rios Colorado e Green.

Parque Nacional de Canyonlands

Parque Nacional de Canyonlands
Ver mais
John Fowler

Parque Nacional de Shenandoah

Englobando uma longa faixa tanto das Montanhas Blue Ridge quanto do adjacente Vale do Rio Shenandoah, este parque nacional na Virgínia é muito procurado no outono, quando quem curte ver a mudança de cor nas folhas vai percorrer a Skyline Drive, um percurso de quase 170 quilômetros.

Parque Nacional de Shenandoah

Parque Nacional de Shenandoah
Ver mais
Josh Grenier

Parque Nacional de Yellowstone

O primeiro parque nacional do mundo é também um dos mais inigualáveis e visitados. Nos quase 900 mil hectares do Yellowstone escondem-se gêiseres, lagos alpinos, florestas, desfiladeiros, quedas d'água e várias espécies ameaçadas. Uma das grandes atrações do parque é a Grand Prismatic Spring, a terceira maior fonte de água termal do mundo.

Parque Nacional de Congaree

Para falar a verdade, nunca tinha ouvido falar deste parque antes desta pesquisa. Mas, depois de ler a respeito, quero muito conhecê-lo. Congaree protege uma vasta área de floresta pantanosa de madeira de lei ao longo do rio de mesmo nome, a sudeste de Columbia, na Carolina do Sul. Os antiquíssimos ciprestes estão entre os mais altos do leste norte-americano.

Parque Nacional de Congaree

Parque Nacional de Congaree
Ver mais

Parque Nacional do Vale da Morte

Baixo e quente, o Vale da Morte é lar tanto das menores elevações quanto das maiores temperaturas dos EUA. Mas, na real, o cenário nesta parte da Califórnia é incrivelmente diverso, variando de bacias salinas, como a Devil's Racetrack, a montanhas com picos de neve eterna que superam os 3.500 metros de elevação.

Parque Nacional do Vale da Morte

Parque Nacional do Vale da Morte
Ver mais

Parque Nacional de Bryce Canyon

Bryce fica no sul de Utah e conta com uma enorme coleção de anfiteatros naturais cobertos de formações rochosas conhecidas como hoodoos.

Parque Nacional de Bryce Canyon

Parque Nacional de Bryce Canyon
Ver mais
Tobias Haase (paraflyer.de)

Parque Nacional das Montanhas Great Smoky

As Great Smoky são cercadas por cidades turísticas cafoninhas e é o parque nacional mais visitado, graças à proximidade com a Costa Leste e à entrada gratuita. Ainda assim, ao chegar lá, é possível ver cenas como esta, na foto abaixo.

Parque Nacional das Montanhas Great Smoky

Parque Nacional das Montanhas Great Smoky
Ver mais

Parque Nacional de Grand Teton

Com nome em homenagem aos três picos mais famosos, o Parque Nacional de Grand Teton também oferece lagos, florestas e parte do Rio Snake. Situado no oeste de Wyoming, ao sul do Parque Yellowstone, juntos eles constituem um dos maiores ecossistemas protegidos do mundo.

Parque Nacional de Grand Teton

Parque Nacional de Grand Teton
Ver mais

Parque Nacional Olympic

Estendendo-se por mais de 400 mil hectares na península de mesmo nome no noroeste de Washington, o terreno deste parque é super variado: vai do litoral do Pacífico a picos alpinos e a floresta tropical temperada.

Parque Nacional de Great Sand Dunes

Um dos mais novos parques nacionais do país (recebeu esse título em 2004), o Great Sand Dunes fica no San Luis Valley, no sul do Colorado. Ostentando as maiores dunas de areia do continente e ladeado por várias montanhas com quase 4.000 metros de elevação, este também é um dos poucos lugares do país onde é possível praticar (ou pelo menos tentar) sandboard, o surfe na areia.

Parque Nacional de Great Sand Dunes

Parque Nacional de Great Sand Dunes
Ver mais

Parque Nacional de Yosemite

A principal atração do Yosemite é o vale do mesmo nome, que tem mais de 18 milhões de metros quadrados e picos esculpidos por geleiras, bosques de sequoias e cachoeiras espetaculares. Para deixar a multidão para trás, explore áreas diferentes desse gigantesco parque na parte leste da Sierra Nevada.

Parque Nacional de Yosemite

Parque Nacional de Yosemite
Ver mais

Parque Nacional dos Arcos

Esse parque de nome adequado, no leste de Utah, a norte de Moab, é lar de cerca de 2.000 arcos de arenito, que assumem todas as formas e todos os tamanhos. Um dos mais fotografados é o Delicate Arch.

Parque Nacional Glacier Bay

Não há estradas que levam a este parque no sul do Alasca. Para chegar aqui, suas escolhas são balsa, através dos rios Tatshenshini e Alsek (saindo do Canadá), por avião (geralmente decolando de Juneau) ou, mais comumente, por cruzeiros de navio.

Parque Nacional Glacier Bay

Parque Nacional Glacier Bay
Ver mais

Parque Nacional de Kings Canyon

Assim como o Parque Nacional da Sequoia, ali ao lado, o Kings Canyon é lar de árvores gigantescas, como os volumosos pinheiros ponderosas.

Parque Nacional de Kings Canyon

Parque Nacional de Kings Canyon
Ver mais

Parque Nacional de Big Bend

Extensas planícies desérticas, montanhas de quase 2.400 metros de elevação e os desfiladeiros do Rio Grande definem o Parque Nacional de Big Bend, no oeste do Texas. Ele se destaca também como International Dark Sky Park, ou seja, é um excelente lugar para ver estrelas.

Parque Nacional Denali

No centro de visitantes, não importa para onde você olhe: este é espetacular. Os quase 2,5 milhões de hectares do Denali, no centro do Alasca, incluem a região mais elevada da cadeia do Alasca (com o pico que batiza o parque), geleiras, vales fluviais e vida selvagem abundante, como ursos-grizzly, caribus, lobos, águias-real, wolverenes e carneiros-de-dall.

Parque Nacional Denali

Parque Nacional Denali
Ver mais

Parque Nacional Everglades

Preservando um dos ecossistemas de terras úmidas mais importantes do mundo, o Everglades, no sul da Flórida, protege espécies raras, como a pantera da Flórida e o crocodilo americano. A água no parque é, na verdade, um enorme rio que vai do Lago Okeechobee até a Florida Bay, na velocidade de cerca de 400 metros por dia.

Parque Nacional Everglades

Parque Nacional Everglades
Ver mais
Jupiter Images

Parque Nacional Gates of the Arctic

Como sugerido pelo nome em inglês (que significa "Portões do Ártico"), esse é o parque mais ao norte dos EUA, e também um dos maiores. A característica geográfica predominante é a Brooks Range. Sem acesso por estrada, é preciso subir a pé ou chegar pelo ar; ao chegar lá, a lista de opções de trilhas e acampamento na vida selvagem é infinita.

Parque Nacional Gates of the Arctic

Parque Nacional Gates of the Arctic
Ver mais
National Parks Service

Parque Nacional do Grand Canyon

Nos últimos vários milhões de anos, o Rio Colorado veio cavando com lentidão e constância as rochas do Colorado Plateau, no norte do Arizona. Alcançando uma largura de quase 30 quilômetros e uma profundidade de mais de 1.800 metros, o Grand Canyon e suas escalas têm pouca comparação com outros lugares na Terra.

Explorar mais

Mark Twain Riverboat on the Mississippi in Hannibal, Missouri
Ver mais

Experiência

Hannibal